‘Travelling Through: Landscapes/Landmarks/Legacies’, School of Art Gallery, 12/10/2018 – 8/2/2019

‘Platform Two’, Steve Whitehead, 1985, oil and alkyd on canvas

Drawn from the School of Art’s extensive collection, Travelling Through traverses five centuries of visual culture ranging from sublime and picturesque landscapes to nineteenth-century travel photographs, twentieth-century London Underground posters and contemporary responses to our environment in a variety of media.

The exhibition, curated by Dr Harry Heuser, explores relationships between tourism and landscape art, between the consumption of signposted sights and the production of personal insights, between the fleeting experience of our journeys and the carbon footprint we leave behind.

 

 

Degree Show & Postgraduate Show Opening, Saturday 19th May 2018 – A Photo Gallery

 

 

(Click on the images to enlarge them.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘the TAKEOVER’ at the Arts Centre, 8th May 2018

Take Over 2018The Creative Arts 3rd year curatorial team and course director Miranda Whall are very excited to welcome you to the Arts Centre Aberystwyth on Tuesday May 8th from 12.00 – 3.00 for the third 2nd & 3rd year annual student TAKEOVER exhibition.

The exhibition includes performance, installation, text, video and audio projects.

You will be greeted at the welcome desk (outside the Great Hall) by Miranda and the students with various goodies, a publication and guide map and a cup of elderflower cordial.

Please arrive for one of the guided tours at either 12.30. 1.30 or 2.30 for the 40 minute (approx) tour, you can leave the tour at any time if you cannot stay that long.

 

There will be a Q&A in the cinema from 3.00 – 4.00 we would be delighted if you could also join us for that.

https://www.instagram.com/thetakeover2018/?hl=en

https://aberartexhibition.wixsite.com/thetakeover2018

‘Sea Change’- exhibition at the School of Art, 21st May – 31st August 2018

Strandgutsammler, photograph, circa 1930-1945, Hans Saebens (1895-1969)

Sea Change is a student-curated exhibition of prints, paintings, photographs and ceramics from the School of Art collection.  The exhibition borrows for its title a phrase from Shakespeare’s Tempest to explore its metaphorical potential.

‘To hell with nature!’ A Reappraisal of Charles Tunnicliffe Prints – at the School of Art Gallery, 12/02/-16/03/2018

TunnicliffePrintsPoster_small‘To hell with nature!’ – A Reappraisal of Charles Tunnicliffe Prints

Painter-printmaker Charles Tunnicliffe (1901–1979) grew up on a farm near Macclesfield in Cheshire. A scholarship enabled him to study at the Royal College of Art in London. Soon after his studies, Tunnicliffe gained a reputation as an etcher of farming subjects. Today, he is widely regarded as Britain’s foremost twentieth-century wildlife artist.

Towards the end of a career spanning six decades, Tunnicliffe was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. In an interview published in the Society’s magazine, Tunnicliffe stated:

‘I have shocked quite a lot of people by saying ‘To hell with nature!’ Nature is made to be used, not to be dictator, as far as the dyed-in-the-wool artist is concerned.’

Tunnicliffe’s exclamation expresses the frustration of an artist whose pictures are often judged on the strength of their fidelity to nature. Instead, Tunnicliffe’s prints show us nature transformed by culture and outdone by art. They demonstrate their maker’s knowledge of art history, his love of design, and the need to tell his own story.

Printmaking earned Tunnicliffe his Royal Academy of Arts membership in 1954. By then, he rarely produced fine art prints. For decades, Tunnicliffe’s work in various media appeared in magazines, on calendars and biscuit tins.

The stock market crash of 1929 had made it necessary for Tunnicliffe to rethink his career. Turning from etching to wood engraving, he became a prolific illustrator. His first project was Tarka the Otter.

Anglesey was no retreat for Tunnicliffe. Working on commission, he created colourful paintings he described as ‘decorations for modern rooms.’ He also continued to turn out mass-reproduced designs that promoted anything from pesticides to the Midland Bank.

Since the mid-1930s, Tunnicliffe’s work has been appreciated mainly second-hand. Until last year, when Robert Meyrick and I put together a catalogue raisonné of his etchings and wood engravings, Tunnicliffe never had a printmaking exhibition at the Royal Academy.

For some of his early prints, no contemporary impressions are known to exist. The plates were proofed by School of Art printmaker Andrew Baldwin.

Tunnicliffe’s career does not fit into the narrative of Modernism. It is a product of modernity. In his work, at least, he never said ‘to hell’ with culture. Pragmatic yet passionate, he made images to make a living.

Harry Heuser, exhibition curator

Curatorial team: Phil Garratt, Neil Holland, Robert Meyrick, Karen Westendorf