‘Print REbels: Haden, Palmer, Whistler & the Origins of the RE’, School of Art Gallery, 18 February – 3 May 2019

PrintREbelsPoster_webIn the Spring of 2018, the Royal Society of Painter-Printmakers (the RE) marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of the founder and its first President Sir Francis Seymour Haden, with Print REbels an exhibition which reflects on its past and present members, the history, and the legacy of the Society. The exhibition brings together a prestigious collection of prints by Haden and those who inspired him such as Rembrandt and Dürer and his contemporaries, including Samuel Palmer and James Abbott McNeill Whistler.

The central narrative of Print REbels is the legacy of Haden and successive RE Presidents. Haden founded the Society of Painter-Etchers in 1880 which gained Royal status in 1888. His tireless campaigning to promote original, creative works in the medium of etching ultimately made him a revered establishment figure, earning him a knighthood in 1893.

Print REbels is the brainchild of Edward Twohig ARE, printmaker, collector, and Head of Art at Marlborough College. Twohig recognized the fact that printmakers such as Haden, Whistler and Palmer were rebelling against the prevailing notion in the mid-Victorian art world and in institutions such as the Royal Academy, that printmaking was merely a means of reproducing paintings and not a creative medium in its own right. Their work paved the way for the Etching Revival in Britain for the next 75 years.

samuel palmer rws the sleeping shepherd early morning 1857 etching on chine colle
The Sleeping Shepherd, Samuel Palmer, 1857, etching

Part of this exhibition includes the Print REbels Portfolio which comprises new works by current RE Members, made specifically in response to the Society’s heritage. Twenty-five of these works have been selected by Jenny Ramkalawon, Assistant Keeper of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum for a Print REbels boxset.

A large, fully illustrated catalogue accompanies the exhibition. RE Members Anne Desmet and Joe Winkelman have compiled a detailed timeline of Sir Francis Seymour Haden’s life and its intertwining with the development of the RE. The catalogue features essays on Haden and his legacy by Elizabeth Harvey-Lee (Hon RE) and on the RE and 20th century printmaking by Aberystwyth University School of Art’s own Professor Robert Meyrick (Hon RE).

Pre-19th, 19th and 20th Century artists include: Seymour Haden, Albrecht Durer, Rembrandt, JMW Turner, Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot, Samuel Palmer, James Tissot, Claire Leighton, Paul Cezanne, Georges Braque and William Russell Flint.

sir francis seymour haden_sunset in ireland_1863_drypoint
Sunset in Ireland, Sir Francis Seymour Haden, 1863, drypoint

Exploring the School of Art Collection 2018

As part of the first year art history module Exploring the School of Art Collections, students have the opportunity to write a small piece for this blog. This year the group decided on the theme of ‘The Stage’. Each student had the opportunity to choose from a selection of prints, drawings and photographs featuring theatres, concerts, ballets, circuses and more. They only had one week to undertake some research before presenting their drafts. They all worked very hard on these projects so please take the time to view their efforts.

Continue reading

History of Printmaking – Lifelong Learning course for 2018/19 starts 24th October

Coursers, Harry Morley, 1931, engraving

Did you know Aberystwyth University holds an outstanding collection of prints? If you would like to learn about the different ways prints are made, and get hands-on experience of our print collection, then History of Printmaking is for you. The course surveys the development of printmaking from the 15th century to the present with reference to the work of many famous artists including Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, Piranesi, Gillray, Whistler and Picasso. By the end of the course you will know your mezzotint from your aquatint, have a good historical understanding of the role of the print in society and be able to start collecting prints with confidence.

Tutor: Phil Garratt

Fee £110, course code CA109

Dydd Mercher / Wednesday, 1.30-4.00pm, Oct 24, Nov 7, 21, Dec 5 19, Jan 9, 23, Feb 6

 Contact Phil Garratt on pjg@aber.ac.uk if you are interested in enrolling or would like further details about the content of the course.

 ( 01970 621580   : learning@aber.ac.uk     www.aber.ac.uk/sell

Addysg Uwch yn y Gymuned / Higher Education in the Community

Postgraduate Show September 2018 – Some Impressions

Our Postgrads have worked hard to create this exhibition and they can be proud of what they have achieved. Here are some impressions of the show and the private view, which was on Saturday, 19th September.

The show is still open Monday, 24th & Tuesday, 25th, 10am-5pm, and Wednesday, 26th September, 10am-3pm. You’re very welcome to visit and explore the postgraduate show and the Sea Change & Discourse: Reynolds to Rego exhibitions in our public galleries! The latter are still on until Friday, 28th, 10am-5pm daily.

(Click on the images to enlarge them.)

Degree Show & Postgraduate Show Opening, Saturday 19th May 2018 – A Photo Gallery

 

 

(Click on the images to enlarge them.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Joseph Wolf – “The best all-round animal painter that ever lived.”

Joseph Wolf, Lance Chalkin, 1890, the Zoological Society of London (Source: Wikipedia)
Joseph Wolf, Lance Chalkin, 1890, the Zoological Society of London (Source: Wikipedia)

Joseph (Mathias) Wolf was born on the 22nd January 1820 in the little village of Mörz, near Koblenz, Germany. His father, Anton Wolf (1788-1859) was a farmer and headman of the village. As a boy, Wolf loved spending time outdoors, observing and sketching the local wildlife. Sometimes, he would shoot specimens to dissect them at home in order to achieve a better understanding of their anatomy, plumage or fur. He would also capture live birds and mammals to draw them. He built special traps to catch large birds of prey without harming them. His obsession, apparently, earned him the unflattering nickname ‘bird fool’ from his father. Watching wildlife became a lifelong passion and, although he killed some for study, he abhorred the mindless slaughter of animals that many Victorians regarded as a ‘manly’ pastime and sport. According to his biographer and friend Alfred Herbert Palmer (1853-1931), son of artist Samuel Palmer (1805-81), Wolf accused these ‘sportsmen’ of having “no desire to know about a thing. Their only desire is to kill it.” He also called man “the most destructive and carnivorous animal in the world.”

Continue reading